Did You Miss the Solar Eclipse This Morning? Here It Is


While most of the U.S. wasn’t able to see this year’s first solar eclipse, some people who live on the East Coast were able to catch a glimpse of the so-called “ring of fire.”

The eclipse was most visible in Canada, Greenland, and Russia.

But don’t worry — we’ve got you covered.


A partial solar eclipse rises behind clouds, Thursday, June 10, 2021, in Arbutus, Md. (AP Photo/Julio Cortez)


A partial solar eclipse rises over the Baltimore skyline, Thursday, June 10, 2021, seen from Arbutus, Md. (AP Photo/Julio Cortez)


A partial solar eclipse rises over the Baltimore skyline, Thursday, June 10, 2021, seen from Arbutus, Md. (AP Photo/Julio Cortez)


The sun is partially eclipsed as it rises over lower Manhattan in New York, Thursday, June 10, 2021. (AP Photo/Seth Wenig)


A partially eclipsed sun peeks out from behind a cloud as it rises over lower Manhattan in New York, Thursday, June 10, 2021. (AP Photo/Seth Wenig)

The eclipse began in Ontario, Canada, at sunrise and ended in southeastern Siberia, according to USA Today. In total, the phenomenon lasted for about an hour and 40 minutes.

A total eclipse will not be visible in the U.S. again until April 8, 2024.

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